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910-799-0110

910-799-0110
1717 Shipyard Blvd Suite 350
Wilmington, NC 28403

910-640-1813
612 Jefferson St. Suite 16
Whiteville, NC 28472

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800-530-KNEE (5633)

Educating Our Patients

Patient education is key at Carolina Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Specialists, not only to inform on diagnosis and treatment options but also to help manage patient anxiety. During your examination, our surgeons, physician assistants and certified medical staff will communicate with you to ensure you understand your diagnosis, the treatment options available and what a return to normal activity will look like. We encourage patients to ask questions and advocate for their healthcare needs. Family and loved-ones are always a welcome part of the care plan discussion.

Orthopedic and sports medicine conditions treated at CSM are many, including:

  • Lateral Epicondylitis (tennis elbow)
  • Medial Epicondylitis (golfer’s elbow)
  • Achilles Tendon Injuries
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Osteoarthritis of the Hip and Knee
  • Patellar Tracking Disorder
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries
  • Degenerative Disc Disease

For more information on these conditions and others, please click on the interactive ViewMedica and/or the information on joint replacements that follow.

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of joint pain. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis or degenerative joint disease, it is a condition that involves the breakdown of joint cartilage. Cartilage is a rubbery tissue that covers the ends of moving bones in joints. It acts as both a shock absorber and a lubricant, protecting your bones from damage and providing smooth, pain-free movement.

Arthritis Pain

As joint cartilage wears away, the bones begin to make painful bone-on-bone contact. The early stages of osteoarthritis can be treated with a variety of conservative, non-surgical treatments. However, as the joint cartilage continues to wear away and the symptoms of osteoarthritis become more severe, surgery may be recommended to correct the damaged bone and cartilage.

To diagnose your condition, an orthopedic surgeon will observe your movement and review your health history. An X-ray of the affected joint will show signs of cartilage wear, and the severity of the cartilage destruction can help determine the best course of treatment.

Often the cause of arthritis is unknown, but osteoarthritis may develop as a result of injury to the joint, excess body weight, or years of wear and tear on the joint cartilage. There is no known cure. The best that doctors can do for patients is to restore motion and reduce pain. Fortunately, total joint replacement has generally proven quite effective at accomplishing these goals.

The joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis are the knees, hips, fingers, and shoulders. Osteoarthritis symptoms include, but are not limited to:

  • Joint pain while standing or moving
  • Giving out or locking of joint
  • Near constant pain
  • Decreased activity
  • Abnormal stance or walk

There are a number of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis. Moderate doctor-prescribed exercise and physical therapy are excellent ways to keep your joints moving and to help relieve moderate joint pain. Joints that are not regularly exercised can become tight and painful.

Excess body weight places extreme pressure on the joints. If you are overweight, your doctor may recommend weight loss to help relieve unwanted stress and pain in your joints.

Descriptions provided by The Arthritis Foundation. Biomet is a manufacturer of orthopedic implants and does not practice medicine. This information was prepared in conjunction with a licensed physician and is presented as general information only. Only an orthopedic surgeon can determine what treatment is appropriate. Always ask your doctor if you have any questions regarding your particular condition or treatment options.

Home Preparation for Joint Replacement Surgery

When you and your orthopedic surgeon decide that joint replacement surgery is the best option to relieve pain and restore motion, you will begin the normal preparation for surgery. You should notify your surgeon about any of the medications you are presently taking because some medications must be stopped before surgery. All surgeries carry certain risks and possible complications. Before surgery, your surgeon will explain the possible complications. Your orthopedic surgeon may ask you to see your primary care physician to make sure that you do not have any health conditions that may complicate your surgery.

You may be asked to donate blood before your surgery. There are several options regarding blood donation and surgery, and all of these options should be explained to you. Surgery also requires anesthesia.

There may be some options regarding anesthesia and they will be explained to you. Your options will be based on your health history, the medications you presently take, and the results of your physical examination.

Your surgeon may also recommend that you start a strengthening program before surgery. The prescribed exercises are designed to help add strength, flexibility. Strengthening your muscles before surgery can assist your postoperative recovery.

After shoulder replacement or other joint replacement surgery, your orthopedic surgeon will give you a specific recovery plan that you should carefully follow. Do not attempt exercises that are not prescribed by your surgeon, and do not attempt to alter your recovery schedule. It takes time for your joint to heal properly.

Planning Ahead for Your Return Home

  • Launder all of your dirty clothing before your surgery. Have loose, comfortable clothing set aside for your recovery time.
  • Prepare single-serving meals before your surgery. These meals can be heated quickly in a microwave and there is less to clean up.
  • Be sure to remove loose rugs and other trip hazards such as electrical cords and magazine racks from walking paths to avoid accidents or falls. If necessary, widen furniture paths to accommodate a walker or cane.
  • To simplify accessibility, place regularly used items such as remote controls, medications, and reading materials in easy-to-reach locations.
  • Un-tuck bedding to allow for easier access in and out of your bed. If your bedroom is on a second floor, it may be helpful to temporarily relocate your sleeping arrangements to a single floor. This will avoid having to climb stairs when you are not feeling your best.
  • Having some assistance after total joint replacement can also be very beneficial. Contact family members or friends ahead of time so they may make the necessary arrangements to assist in your recovery.

This information was prepared in conjunction with a licensed physician and is presented as general information only. Biomet is a manufacturer of orthopedic implants and does not practice medicine. Only an orthopedic surgeon can determine what treatment is appropriate. Individual results of total joint replacement may vary. The life of any implant will depend on your weight, age, activity level, and other factors. For more information on risks, warnings, and possible adverse effects, see the Patient Risk Information section found within Biomet.com. Always ask your doctor if you have any questions regarding your particular condition or treatment options.

The knee is a type of hinge joint formed by the tibia (shin bone), femur (thigh bone), and patella (kneecap). The ends of the bones in the knee joint are covered with cartilage, a tough, lubricating tissue that helps provide smooth, pain-free motion to the joint.

Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a wear and tear condition that destroys joint cartilage, and it typically develops after years of constant motion and pressure in the joints. As the cartilage continues to wear away, bone begins to rub against bone, causing the irritation, swelling, stiffness, and discomfort commonly associated with arthritis.

The shoulder joint contains the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) and the scapula (shoulder blade). The head of the humerus rides against the scapula in a tiny depression called the glenoid, much like a golf ball on a tee. The smaller size of the glenoid is what allows the wide range of motion in a healthy shoulder. The surfaces of the humerus and the glenoid are covered with a lubricating tissue called cartilage. The cartilage provides the shoulder joint frictionless, pain-free movement.

Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a wear and tear condition that destroys joint cartilage, and it typically develops after years of constant motion and pressure in the joints. As the cartilage continues to wear away, bone begins to rub against bone, causing the irritation, swelling, stiffness, and discomfort commonly associated with arthritis.

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